David Hautzig's Match Report

West Ham 3, Brighton 3. It's Inevitable Now.

“Think we stay up or go down”? That’s what I asked Nigel Kahn the other day, after West Brom’s reserve team handled us with relative ease.

“Ask me after Brighton” was his reply. I cannot say that filled me with anything other than more nest and anger because Brighton have been a bogey side for us.

We are truly a train wreck, quite possibly the worst run top tier sports team on the planet. I’ve had arguments with some who say the New York Knicks of the NBA are worse. But being in the top two of that league is an even worse position to be I than our current spot in the league. Me? I think we are 50-50 at best to retain our top flight status. If going down is what it would take to get rid of Sullivan, Brady, and Gold, I’d be tempted to take that deal with the devil. It might be a deal we have no choice but to consider.

And as I sat down to proofread and then post, I made the choice not to add pictures. I didn’t want to look at them to be perfectly honest.

It only took until the second minute for Brighton to show how truly shambolic we can look at times on defense. Brighton broke down the left, and with Mooy and Hammer killer Murray in the box it looked like we were doomed. Montoya crossed, and if Mooy had put his header on target it would have been a very early goal for the visitors because Fabianski was beaten. Moments later it was West Ham on the attack, with Haller rolling a pass to Fredericks while flat on his back. The Hammer’s right back floated a ball into the box that Montoya put out for a corner. A minute later Soucek directed a free kick from Noble that Ryan did very well to save.

Pace. We have almost none in the squad, with the notable exception of Antonio. Numerous time early in the match he began runs that Montoya could not handle. I could see Antonio begin his run, and Montoya still lost the race. He won a corner making such a run, he won a free kick making such a run. Oh to have more of that. And two healthy hamstrings on the one that does have it.

Brighton had another chance to take the lead in the 25th minute when Fredericks and Diop simply fell asleep at the wheel, allowing Trossard to run in between them and get onto a pass from Stephens. All alone in front of Fabianski, his shot went straight at the keeper. A minute later West Ham won a corner when Webster put a cross from Antonio. The Hammers went short and got nothing out of it. A moment later Noble won a free kick. But whatever the plan was between the captain and Snodgrass it didn’t work when the eventual set piece flew over everyone, with Haller very offside anyway.

The pace I mentioned earlier came to the forefront again in the 30th minute when Antonio again beat Montoya and won a free kick. Snodgrass put a good ball into the box, and Diop directed it behind Ryan for his second goal in the past three league matches. Maybe he should play striker as his defending has been suspect of late.

West Ham 1
Brighton 0

West Ham countered in the 36th minute, but instead of crowd noise the best soundtrack for what occurred would have been the theme from Keystone Cops. Noble sent a low pass for Ogbonna to run onto in the box. He couldn’t get a shot off, and tried to tee up Noble in the box. But our esteemed servant completely missed his shot and fell over himself. A minute later Fredericks sent a cross that Antonio hit perfectly on the volley but Montoya blocked it. Moments later Antonio took a long crossfield pass from Rice, cut to his left and tried one of his usually poor long range shots. At least this one was on target, albeit right at Ryan.

West Ham was on the attack again in the final minute of the opening half with Snodgrass on the run. He slowed down enough to let Fredericks overlap, and the Scot rolled a pass for the right back to get to. Fredericks looped a pass into the box that was initially cleared, but right to Snodgrass. The one time subject of the inept owners bullying fired a shot that took a deflection off Webster and into the net.

Halftime
West Ham 2
Brighton 0

In the opening moments of the second half Brighton won a free kick from a dangerous position when Snodgrass took down Bernardo. The free kick was sent out for a corner, and that’s when the Keystone Cops music started again. Fabianski came out to meet the corner, but his attempted punch came right out of the Roberto playbook and hit Ogbonna in the head and bounced in for an own goal. Comfortable to Panic Stations in the blink of an eye.

West Ham 2
Brighton 1

West Ham won a free kick in the 51st minute when Antonio refused to stop running. After two attempts, Stephens finally took him down. But he stayed down. With his brittle body, from shoulders to legs, it was a sight nobody could say they were shocked by. He was able to continue, but the additional worry was there.

Despite the pain, Antonio went on yet another marauding run that ended in a corner. Cresswell’s delivery was headed clear, but right to Snodgrass. In a scene eerily reminiscent of his first half goal, Snoddy struck the ball very well on the volley. This time, however, the deflection was courtesy of Bernardo. Ryan was helpless.

West Ham 3
Brighton 1

In the 70th minute, Antonio decided that Montoya had suffered plenty and wanted to share the pain with Webster on the right side. He crossed the field and got on the end of a rolling pass from Rice. His shot, however, didn’t trouble Ryan. Two minutes later Cresswell conceded a corner after a head to head battle with Brighton substitute Schelotto. The initial delivery was handled, but the ball went to March and he let loose a rifle shot that Fabianski did well to save.

A minute later, the farcical nature of West Ham’s defense was beyond pathetic. I don’t even know what to say to be honest. I blame Diop more than Ogbonna, because it was Diop who just stood there and watched a ball in front of him. Gross didn’t really do much other than put his body where the ball was. And it bounded off him and behind Fabianski for a slow, painful roll into the net.

West Ham 3
Brighton 2

A minute later, Propper sent a cross into the box that once again nobody on West Ham dealt with. It looked to hit Murray on the arm, but as it turned out it was his chest and the comeback…and possibly West Ham’s relegation…was complete.

Final Score
West Ham 3
Brighton 3

The last ten minutes were a bit of a blur, mostly because I decided not to sit in front of the TV anymore and got up to keep busy and move around a bit. The shambolic way in which our defense blew these vital three points was enough for me to throw in the towel. I cannot see a way back, but if that means the absurd way in which the current board have found fit to run this club will come to an end than maybe it’s worth it in the very long run.


David Hautzig's Match Report

West Ham 1, Everton 1. Respect...You Know The Rest.

January. Relegation Battle. Mercenaries in the form of agents running a scouting system that doesn’t exist. Protests to get rid of the owners who are as likely to remove themselves from power as Trump saying he was wrong and stepping down. Just another day in Stratford.

I have often looked at my frequent visits to London with melancholy, wishing I was wealthy enough to have a home there and the means to go back and forth on a whim. But I gotta tell you. Distance is helpful to a degree. I can tune it all out, knowing that the ten years our board have been in charge has brought far more anguish than joy, so I no longer expect any joy whatsoever. Until the day they tape up the last box of their personal belongings and get the hell out, those expectations shall remain.

Oh. We played Everton today. Draw. Not awful

Funny. For the first few minutes of the match I forgot that Carlo Ancelotti was the manager of Everton. It wasn’t until Danny Gabbidon started talking about him that I remembered it. Not that I was one of those people that thought we should have replaced Pellegrini with the highly successful Italian. Nor am I convinced Ancelotti will do particularly well on Merseyside. He might. But like our departed Chilean, he is used to working with top ingredients in his kitchen. West Ham and Everton are similar in terms of quality.

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The Hammers started reasonably well, pressing high up the pitch and breaking well when in possession. In the 5th minute, after stripping Davies of the ball, Noble fed the ball in the direction of Snodgrass. The in-form Scot used the help of a deflection to get a shot off from the top of the Everton eighteen yard box but it had no power and was straight as an arrow into the arms of Pickford.

The next 15 minutes or so were a whole lot of nothing, but in the 19th minute the Hammers came alive. First, Noble did very well to get a ball into the box for Haller, whose header went just wide. Moments later Zabaleta had a shot from close range that came off Delph and out for a corner. Then Snodgrass was sent in alone but it was flagged for offside. In the midst of all that, Noble made not one but two very bad passes that could have ended very badly for West Ham had it not been for timely defending by Ogbonna.

West Ham should have taken the lead in the 25th minute when Noble sent Haller in with a rolled pass after a giveaway by Digne. But Pickford made himself nice and wide, kept those legs closed, and kept our record signing off the scoresheet. A minute later Lanzini broke down the left and tried to find Haller in the box, but a vital touch by Digne averted possible disaster for the visitors.

Everton had their first chance of the half in the 32nd minute when, after working the ball around the West Ham box Digne sent a looping pass over the West Ham defense towards Walcott. Had the former England international gotten better contact, the ball would likely have seen the back of the net instead of the yellow of Randolph’s shirt.

In the 39th minute, Lanzini drew a foul from Delph on the left side of the Everton box. Snodgrass stepped up and made yet another excellent delivery into the box, and Diop was there to direct it past Pickford.

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West Ham 1
Everton 0

The lead was short lived, three minutes to be exact. Everton won a corner after some pressing by Walcott. The corner from Digne got a glance from Holgate, and was then headed past Randolph by Calvert-Lewin.

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West Ham 1
Everton 1

In the final seconds of the first half, West Ham came very close to a second goal when Zabaleta did well to chase a ball down at the end line and float a cross to Fornals. The young Spaniard headed the ball into the ground and towards goal, and it took a very fine save by Pickford to keep the score deadlocked before halftime.

Halftime
West Ham 1
Everton 1

Everton started the second half well, and were a bit unlucky not to take the lead. First, Walcott sent a cross into the box that Randolph reached out to clear with a punch. It didn’t make it past Gordon, but his effort went over the bar. Moments later, it was Walcott again who found Calvert-Lewin at the near post but he didn’t have room to do anything and the ball went out for a goal kick. Seconds later Digne curled a good corner kick into the area. West Ham couldn’t deal with it, and the ball went to Davies on the bounce. Lucky for West Ham Davies put his attempt wide of the target.

The home side tried to work their way into the second half and won a corner in the 56th minute. The set piece was met by Pickford and punched clear. I wish there was more to say about that bit of action, but there wasn’t. Everton stayed on the front foot, dominated the midfield, and West Ham were on the ropes.

Speaking of the midfield, I’m going to use this little platform of mine to weigh in on the Gedson Fernandes fiasco. And yes, it was a fiasco of mismanagement. I don’t care that some say we were played by agents, the deal wasn’t our to lose. It was. If we had an actual football management structure in place as opposed to a real estate mogul using eat-what-we-kill agents running the ship, the player would have been ours. I have no idea if he would have been a good signing from an on the pitch perspective. If anything, a bottom feeder like West Ham likely needs a Joe Allen more than a 21 year old from Portugal. We patch the leak, we don’t replace the roof. But the kid was public in his desire to join us. If we had moved quickly, it would have been done. The papers reported that it was the 40 million pound OPTION that stood in our way. The words alone tell you it’s nonsense. We could have said NO after the 18 months. Or we could have leveraged our option against others that might have wanted him. We would have had a semblance of control. In my opinion, this was another example of Sullivan entering the fray for appearance sake, never having the intention or moxie to pull it off. Perhaps he’s not even as good a businessman as some might think, because this one was handed to him on a plate.

Back to the match.

Masuaku replaced Fornals in the 60th minute. That made me nervous. Fornals has been our best midfielder by some margin lately. Masuaku did win a corner a minute after entering the game, but the delivery was truly dreadful and Everton cleared with ease. A few minutes later it was Everton that won a corner off of Zabaleta, but Mina’s header was no issue for Randolph.

West Ham won a corner in the 70th minute from a deflected shot by Snodgrass that almost went over Pickford, but the England numero uno got a hand to it and pushed it behind the net. West Ham then won a couple of free kicks near the 80 minute mark, but on both occasions the delivery from Snodgrass wasn’t good enough and Everton were able to clear the area. With ten minutes to go I was ready to just hold the point close and not let it go.

Until proven 100% otherwise I refuse to completely give up on Ajeti, much like Fornals before him. When he came on, he showed grit and determination. Not to mention a bit of the dark arts when he leaned back into Holgate. VAR checked for a possible a red card, and it was determined that Holgate made more of the incident than was actually there.

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Everton won a late free kick in added time when Zabaleta welcomed Gordon to The Premier League with an experienced shoulder to halt a run. The ball eventually came to Davies, but his shot was blocked over for a corner by Masuaku. West Ham handled the ensuing set piece and that was that.

Final Score
West Ham 1
Everton 1

When you are a club mired in yet another Race Towards Relegation, with absolutely no coherent plan and virtually no support staff to help avoid that, that old adage we hated under Sam is unfortunately true. Respect The Point. That’s where we are. That’s where we will be under the Sullivan, Gold, and Brady. We have a decade worth of evidence that makes that point abundantly clear. I don’t know if a billion pounds in the transfer market would make that much of a difference with such ineptitude at the top.

I’m beginning to embrace the horror we are in because there isn’t any choice.


The David Hautzig Column

My Top 11 Of The Last 10

Goalkeeper: Adrian
Sorry Fabs. If the decade were longer you’d have likely won out.

Central Defender 1: Winston Reid
*Once Sam taught him how to defend in the Premier League, he was among the first names on the team sheet.

Central Defender 2: James Collins
*As dependable as a Subaru. Built like one, too.

Right Back: Pablo Zabaleta
*I think this speaks to how woeful we have been at this position.

Left Back: Aaron Cresswell
*Better than Zabaleta, but basically the same point as above.

Right Midfield: Michail Antonio
*It’s easy to forget that Antonio has been with us for some time. And in that time, his positives are enough to give him the spot.

Central Midfield 1: Mark Noble
*There should be no reason to defend this call. So I won’t.

Central Midfield 2: Kevin Nolan
*This one is a tougher call, but his work to get us promoted and then stabilize us is the decider for me.

Left Midfield: Le Snake
*His one year of brilliance was enough.

Striker 1: Carlton Cole
*His goals got us promoted, and he was always there when we needed him. Longevity plays a part in this decision, even though Arnautovic was a better striker in a vacuum.

Striker 2: Andy Carroll
*We might not want to admit it, but his signing made us relevant in the transfer market. The end product was far les than we paid for, but he scored 34 goals. Not much. But only Cole scored more.


David Hautzig's Match Report

Gillingham 0, West Ham 2. A Win Is A Win Is A Win.

For years, I usually treated both domestic cup competitions with an equal amount of fear and disregard. Our league position was so perilous so often I could not help but see those matches as pointless because, well, they didn’t come with points. Of course there were occasional exceptions. 2006 obviously comes to mind, but Pards had us mid-table pretty much the whole season so the FA Cup was a Get One Free with the already paid for EPL season. But then Slaven Bilic held up his hands, holding an imaginary cup when asked what would mean more, the FA Cup or a top four finish. I flew over that year to say goodbye to Upton Park and to attend the incredible replay win over Liverpool. If VAR had been in place we would have made the semi-finals, of that I’m sure. The point is, my feelings about the cups have been altered. I can’t say I’d trade relegation for a trophy yet, but in time you never know.

Gillingham came in to todays match unbeaten in their last eight League One matches. They dispatched Premier League opposition Cardiff in last season’s FA Cup, and West Ham have made League One in cups the equivalent of Liverpool at Anfield of late. So the table was set for another disappointing result. Instead, West Ham did what they were supposed to as opposed to what we expected them to do.

Gillingham started the match brightly, as one might expect from a lower division side on their home pitch. They won two corners, the second from a somewhat sloppy clearance by Ogbonna. Snodgrass and Lanzini shared in the sloppiness with a bad pass and a giveaway respectively. A free kick in the eight minute required a clearance by Haller, but Gillingham kept up the pressure and won a third corner. Suffice it to say West Ham started the game at a snails pace.

In the 15th minute, Rice and Lee got into a tussle for the ball at the top of the West Ham eighteen yard box, and the other referee named Madley awarded the home side a free kick. They tried a little trickery on the set piece that didn’t come off, but neither did West Ham’s clearance. Gillingham came right back with a long range shot by O’Keefe, but Fabianski made the easy save.

Harassment is a very effective tool for a lower division side with less talent than their Premier League foe. Hanlan used that to great effect in the 22nd minute when he harassed Balbuena into a conceding a corner, and then he won the ball back for a point blank shot that Fabianski did well to save.

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The Hammers had their first look at the Gillingham penalty area in the 31st minute when Anderson recovered from a bad touch and sent the ball wide to Masuaku. The man on the left wing won a corner when Fuller blocked a cross, but West Ham did zero with the opportunity. Overall, our play could be described to that point as ugly and disjointed. Even with five in the middle the hosts dominated that area, and every single player in white looked like they assumed no work was needed to win today. With a strong starting eleven, it was hard to see where any impetus would come.

The biggest risk and thus worry about playing a strong side in a match like this, especially when your squad is as deep as a baby blow up pool, is injury. Right back is not an area West Ham are blessed with depth, so seeing Fredericks limp off was just the thing we didn’t want to see. But thems the breaks when you want a cup run.

Halftime
Gillingham 0
West Ham 0

West Ham should have scored in the first minute of the second half when Anderson sent Haller in on Bonham all alone. But in what looked like a moment of overconfidence Haller strolled in and put the ball twenty feet over the crossbar. Haller looked at the pitch as if to blame a rogue patch of dirt for his ills, but he alone was to blame for the sorry shot. Moments later Haller had another chance when he was sent in by a long ball from Diop. It looked a lost cause but Haller kept going and one timed a shot in between the post and the keeper. It bounced off the inside of the post and across the face of goal. West Ham showed more urgency in the opening minutes of the second half than the whole opening forty-five.

Despite more time on the ball and more control of the match, West Ham were not able to get themselves in a position to really bother the Gillingham defense. Bad touches, slips, and other errant moves kept being the Hammers undoing. They had a valid shout for a penalty in the 66th minute when Rice was clearly held by Ogilvie while attacking a free kick from Lanzini. Where’s VAR when you need it?

As the second half rolled on, Masuaku and Anderson started to find space down the left. The gave each other early, fast passes so that whichever one was the recipient could get into the box quickly. In the 73rd minute, Anderson rolled a pass for Masuaku to get to at the end-line. He sent a low cross into the box that just missed Fornals, but found Zabaleta. For the first time in a West Ham kit, Pablo Zabaleta took a shot that ended up behind the goalkeeper and in the net.

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Gillingham 0
West Ham 1

Gillingham did not roll over, and Hanlan won a corner in the 82nd minute. The delivery was cleared, but O’Keefe got hold of a shot that might have tested Fabianski had it not been deflected and slowed down. The Hammers won a corner of their own moments later, and if defenders interfering by holding and pulling on shirts in the box was recently deemed within the laws of the game, I didn’t get the memo. Haller was absolutely mugged trying to get into position.

Marshall worked the ball into the corner in the 89th minute and won a corner. West Ham cleared, but not far enough and Marshall was there again to work the ball back into the box. Haller in particular did a fine job defending the many aerial lobs into the penalty area, but Gillingham kept searching for the late equalizer and a replay.

Cue the joke about them being the only ones who wanted to go to The London Stadium.

With Gillingham searching and probing in added time, it was West Ham who broke in numbers as the clock ran down. Fornals was the man with the last word, rifling a shot past Bonham.

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Gillingham 0
West Ham 2

Considering our recent banana skins in cups, we have no choice but to respect the win. Two wins and two clean sheets in Moyes 2.0. Hopefully the manager was able to use today to learn a bit more about the squad and how to make it respectable again.


David Hautzig's Match Report

West Ham 4, Bournemouth 0. Moyes 2.0 A Good Update Thus Far.

Let me be utterly transparent, so that there is no need to read between any lines.

David Moyes is not our enemy.

David Moyes did nothing wrong.

David Moyes has not lied.

David Moyes has not treated supporters with contempt.

If anything, we should be grateful he has agreed to return and do his best to help the club escape from yet another catastrophe in all likelihood created by his past and current employers. To those clamoring for the likes of Kovac, Allegri, Pochetino, or anybody else considered a Top Shelf Manager, I ask you;

Are you mad?!?!

If they are as good as you say, then they must be of higher intellect. And if they are of higher intellect, then they have more then enough sense to avoid our owners like an infectious disease. We do not have the currency to shop in those stores. Among those we were realistically linked with, David Moyes was the best option.

I for one was surprised he said yes. If it were me, and I admittedly hold very long, bitter grudges against those who have treated me or my family badly, I would have told the board to F-OFF. And our board treated David Moyes very badly. But there he was, smiling at the cameras while acting like a gentleman and a professional. When offered the chance by a journalist to take a little dig at the man in the silly Russian hat, he wouldn’t go there. He showed class. Which none in our current Executive Branch have showed of late, if ever.

At the time of kickoff, West Ham were in historically familiar territory. The relegation zone. Most supporters and pundits were expecting Moyes to switch to a back three with wingbacks. But with only two days to train, he opted for the same formation we have used since the start of the campaign. Having said that, I was surprised that Antonio’s current hamstring issue was not met with someone else joining Haller up top. I was also surprised at the result, but I’ll take it with bells on.

West Ham won a free kick in the 13th minute that could be considered the first attempt of the match when Wilson was called for handball. But Cresswell didn’t beat his first man, and you can’t succeed on set pieces when that happens. But if skill cannot do the job, luck will do. And The Hammers had that in the 18th minute when Anderson and Snodgrass combined quite well on the right side of the Bournemouth eighteen yard box. Snodgrass picked out Noble in the box, and his deflected shot went past Ramsdale.

West Ham 1
Bournemouth 0

Snodgrass was back at it again a few minutes later, and his run at Rico came inches from being a penalty. But the foul was committed just outside the box. The delivery deflected off of Anderson and out for another corner. The Cherries cleared, but West Ham closed down with a level of intensity all over the pitch not seen this season. That work rate paid off in the 25th minute when Snodgrass and Fredericks worked the ball down the right. Fredericks sent a cross into the box and Haller finished it in a manner befitting a 45 million pound signing.

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West Ham 2
Bournemouth 0

Bournemouth had a decent spell of possession after Haller’s strike, but West Ham held their line and kept their shape, and eventually cleared the area and launched a counter. After a long ball for Haller caused Rico to put the ball out for a throw, the Hammers kept up the pressure with Noble at the forefront. It culminated with the captain dancing around Wilson on the right side. The second he got into the box, I knew what he would do. He would create contact, not dive, and win a penalty. He did just that.

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West Ham 3
Bournemouth 0

As the opening forty-five minutes wound down, Bournemouth had their best spell of the match so far. Rico tried a long range shot from just outside the West Ham eighteen yard box that Fabianski had to parry away for an eventual Bournemouth corner. But again, West Ham stayed disciplined and the corner amounted to nothing.

Halftime
West Ham 3
Bournemouth 0

The second half started with West Ham showing no letup in their pressure. Anderson sent Cresswell into the box with a little chip pass over the head of Francis, and the current version of AC won a corner. Bournemouth cleared but as soon as any visitor got on the ball he was hounded by someone in Claret & Blue. The constant harassment led to a superb run by Haller down the right. He saw Fornals making a run into the box and sent a cross his way. Had it not been for a last ditch effort by Cook to get a touch on the ball Fornals would have been in prime position to volley the ball into the back of the net.

Moments later it was again Haller launching an attack. He laid it off for Snodgrass in the box, but with the ball on his weaker right foot he took another touch instead of a hopeful shot and the moment was lost. A minute later, Snodgrass won a free kick 25 yards from goal. Cresswell stepped up to take it, and my guess is he will hope everyone watching the match was posting on Instagram or checking email as opposed to watching the match.

In pursuit of balance, I’m going to be critical about something. Anderson, despite working hard and making runs, still looked off. He made quite a few poor passes, and when given the chance to run at the Bournemouth defense he took a long range shot. But in what can only be described as delightful irony, just as Anderson was about to be replaced by Lanzini, Rice sent a peach of a long pass over the top of the Bournemouth defense that Anderson ran onto. The Brazilian brought it down, ran at Ramsdale, and slotted it home as his parting gift to the evening’s proceedings.

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West Ham 4
Bournemouth 0

The only blight on the day for West Ham came in the 75th minute when Cresswell was shown a red card for a rash challenge on Fraser. When VAR went to check, I thought it was just for posterity. But stunningly, the red card was overturned by the video referee and switched to yellow. While it would have had no effect on today, the decision certainly saved Moyes a headache on Saturday and beyond.

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Bournemouth came oh so close to ruining Fabianski’s clean sheet in the 80th minute. Fraser recovered from Cresswell’s challenge to make a run down the left. He crossed into the box for Solanke, who re-directed the ball with his head. It beat Fabianski, but hit the far post and floated into the West Ham keepers arms.

The Hammers came equally oh so close to a fifth goal minutes later when Lanzini played the roll of a striker about a foot taller than he is and got on the end of a cross in the box. His header was hard and low, but Ramsdale made a good stop. Seconds later, Cresswell danced down the left and found Fornals in the box with a low pass. But once again Ramsdale was up to the task and made the save.

There are terms and cliches used in football that sometimes just sound like ways to fill airtime and newspaper columns. Graft, courage, playing for the shirt are a few that come to mind. But today they don’t sound out of place for West Ham. In terms of work rate, closing down, and organization, today was the best performance of the season. Yet it wasn’t devoid of skill or flair. It was, simply put, a fine overall display. So, as my best mate Jon asked right after the final whistle, why did the same players play under the same formation but look that good when they looked so bad a few days earlier? I can’t answer that. But I will not let that legitimate question get in the way of this good day.

Happy New Year.

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